RFCX IN THE NEWS

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Announcing Bourhan Yassin as Rainforest Connection’s new CEO

Rainforest Connection is excited to announce that current COO, Bourhan Yassin, has been appointed as the new CEO for the …

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The Straits Times: What does deforestation sound like? Eavesdropping on the rainforest to detect threats

The tropical forest can be an assault to the senses. The air is laden with strong scents, and the bright colours of flora and fauna are distracting. Above all, it is hard to miss the hum of life. In a bid to protect the tropical forests of the world, Rainforest Connection has scaled the trees from Cameroon to Sumatra with gadgets and gizmos aplenty. In this article from The Straits Times, the process by which RFCx detects illegal logging to save forests and reverse the effects of climate change.

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HUAWEI BLOG: PROTECTING INDONESIA’S FORESTS THROUGH THREAT RESPONSE

In this Huawei blog post, we discuss the technologies, processes, and use cases that enable rangers and communities to take action to protect endangered ecosystems, with a focus on West Sumatra.

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Huawei Blog: Nature Thriving: The Wolves of Aoos Gorge, Greece

In Greece’s spectacular Aoos Gorge and surrounding mountains, Nature Guardians – acoustics sensors networked to cloud AI – have been deployed to detect the gunshots of poachers and hunters who target local wildlife, including wolves, bears, and the endangered Balkan chamois. See the latest project updates in Greece, and how a recent visit from our Lead Field Installation Specialist, Lawrence Whittaker, went!

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NatGeo: You can now hear rainforest sounds worldwide—here’s why that matters

A massive acoustic monitoring effort covers about 480 square miles in the Republic of Congo’s Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park—an area about the size of Los Angeles. It’s part of Cornell University’s Elephant Listening Project, established in 1999 to detect communication among forest elephants and pinpoint poaching activity. Learn about this project, how they’re sharing Rainforest Connection acoustics, and why it’s so important to make this ability accessible to others.

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Washington Post: Listen for the Trees

What if you could use technology to listen for the tell-tale sounds of loggers from a distance, and maybe even catch them before they have a chance to cut down a single tree? The Washington Post outlines the origins of Rainforest Connection, and how the concept earned its CEO the Rolex Award for Enterprise .

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Network Digital 360: AI and IoT to safeguard the biodiversity of the Italian Oases

A team made up of WWF members, RFCx technicians and forest rangers are installing devices capable of detecting and recording the sounds of nature in three Italian Oases to stop illegal activities in protected areas, and to study the species present and better preserve its conservation. Learn about the project scope, the partners involved, and what this collaboration means for this area.

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Forbes: Protecting Rainforests with Big Data and AI

You might not think saving the world’s tropical rainforests is a data challenge, but the urgent task of protecting the last remaining two million square miles of forest is precisely that. What is more, the challenge holds vital lessons for anyone tackling a data project with seemingly insurmountable odds. In this piece, Hitachi Vantara CEO Gajen Kandiah explores Hitachi Vantara’s partnership with CEO to develop AI algorithms to detect the sounds of illegal logging.

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Five Media: The Spy Tech That Listens Out for Illegal Logging

A major challenge for those protecting the forest is actually finding illegal loggers in time to stop them. Rainforests spanning thousands of hectares are not easy to patrol, and resources to do so are often minimal. In the face of this huge problem, the latest weapon is a very small gadget. Five Media explores Rainforest Connection’s technology and its applications in threat detection and bioacoustic monitoring.

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Silicon Republic: Smart Whale Sounds, A first-of-its-kind project off the coast of Ireland

RFCx has helped launch a first-of-its-kind project to monitor the acoustics of whales, dolphins and porpoises off the southern coast of Ireland. Sound data from a data-gathering buoy will be used to create machine learning models for wildlife detection and classification.

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